Ask Asia: How do I get the most out of this semester?

Ask Asia: How do I get the most out of this semester?

Asia Duren

Reporter

Q: It’s only a month into the semester, but I’m pretty sure I’m failing one of my classes. What do I do? – Worried
A: There are so many things you can do! First, are you actually paying attention in class? Are you completing homework on time? Have you committed enough time to studying? If you said no to any or all of those questions, you should be trying harder in the class. If the answer to those questions is yes and you are still struggling, talk to your professor. He or she can give you some guidance. If you need the class to graduate, then try and stick it out. Go to the Student Success Center on the first floor of Reneau Hall and get a tutor. If you do not need the class to graduate, talk to your professor about getting a WP and dropping the class without it counting as a failing grade. You have options. I promise this is not the end of the world. 

Students learn about volunteer opportunities at community service fair

Sumra Hayden

Reporter

The W held its community service fair on Sept. 14 in the W Room to encourage students to volunteer and make a difference in their local community. 

Local agencies such as the Greater Columbus Learning Center had informative booths set up for those interested to stop by and learn more about potential volunteer opportunities. 

From sketchpads to skyscrapers...

Jessica Barnett

Editor

From day one, it felt like this semester set itself apart from every semester before it. It’s almost as if the campus got dumped into an alternate but mostly similar universe, where it’s close enough to reality that we assume it is but just different enough that we feel the need to comment on it.

I say “we” because all it takes is attending one class or eating a meal on campus to hear other students saying the same.

W continues winning streak into new school year

Lauren Trimm

Reporter

Enrollment has gone up 11 percent. Fall 2016 has the largest group of international students yet. More students are obtaining degrees, with a 206 percent growth since 2011. 

Recent awards include the highest-ranked Mississippi university on Washington Monthly’s “Best Bang for the Buck” list, a fifth year on the Washington Monthly’s list of Top 100 Master’s Schools in the nation and another year on U.S. News & World Report’s top 20 public Southern regional universities.

Construction plans move forward for W

Lauren Trimm

News Editor

Several projects are being planned on campus in order to continue making improvements, including remodeling The W's Demonstration School and demolishing Taylor Hall and Keirn Hall.

The first major project is the renovation of the Demonstration School. Originally home to the state's first laboratory school for teaching, the school provided education for students in kindergarten through fourth grade as well as university students seeking degrees in education. The demonstration school was also home to the first African-American member of the W faculty in 1970.

Heavy hearts, clear minds: the story of international students

Editor's Note: This is part two of a story that was printed in The Spectator on Sept. 23, 2016. Part one of the story can be found here.

Anush Aryal

Reporter

He didn’t speak to his roommate for three days. Now, he understands that his roommate was going through the same experience and they could have made things better had they hugged and consoled each other. 

Heavy hearts, clear minds: the story of international students

Anush Aryal

Reporter

Amun Kharel could be considered just another average guy from Kathmandu. Kharel played various sports on the weekend, supported FC Barcelona and lived all his life with his family. It was an easy-going life until he got the itch for more. He found himself yearning for higher education in the field of management information systems, but more than that, he wanted the education in an international setting. He soon found himself considering life as an expatriate in the United States.

There can be a separate column for how ugly or beautiful the process from thought to action is, but the fact remains that Kharel eventually decided to move his life across the Atlantic. On Aug. 4, he joined a record-breaking group of international students, the largest group ever to enroll at Mississippi University for Women. Each student had his or her own dream of life in America, but also the sinking realization that home was now thousands of miles away. They were now segregated from the lives they had lived so comfortably.